Benefit office – Slimming Pills Review http://slimmingpillsreview.com/ Thu, 19 May 2022 21:26:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://slimmingpillsreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Benefit office – Slimming Pills Review http://slimmingpillsreview.com/ 32 32 Are virtual conferences better for the environment? https://slimmingpillsreview.com/are-virtual-conferences-better-for-the-environment/ Thu, 19 May 2022 19:33:00 +0000 https://slimmingpillsreview.com/are-virtual-conferences-better-for-the-environment/ Working virtually has a positive impact on employees morale and productivity. But could it also help save the environment? According to research by engineers at the University of Texas at Austin, a single attendee at an in-person conference in 2019 had the same environmental footprint as 7,000 attendees at a virtual conference. “One of the […]]]>

Working virtually has a positive impact on employees morale and productivity. But could it also help save the environment?

According to research by engineers at the University of Texas at Austin, a single attendee at an in-person conference in 2019 had the same environmental footprint as 7,000 attendees at a virtual conference.

“One of the many shared priorities in the boardrooms of America’s largest corporations is how to reduce our environmental footprint,” says Adam Riggs, founder and CEO of online collaboration platform Frameable. “And virtual spaceswhether you use them temporarily for an event that you would otherwise have hosted in a hotel ballroom, have a huge potential positive impact on the environment.

Read more: This CEO thinks the Metaverse will bridge in-person and remote work

In fact, a University of Michigan study found that a virtual conference hosted by AirMiners, an initiative to reduce carbon dioxide levels in the air, produced 66 times fewer greenhouse gas emissions. greenhouse than an in-person gathering in San Francisco due to commuting alone.

“We understand that there’s a lot that needs to happen in person, and some meeting software is really far inferior to the in-person version,” Riggs says, noting that while business travel leaves a killer mark on the environment, the lost economic benefits should not be overlooked. “But if [companies] are willing to explore with virtual spaces like the ones we are building, it can have a huge uplifting impact on morale and it can also have a corresponding effect decrease in emissions.

Between March and April 2020 – the first full month workers worked fully remote – paper purchases in the United States have fallen by 90% according to a 2020 study conducted by the Office of Sustainability at Yale. In turn, US businesses saved $105,000 and saw 97% fewer emissions from copiers, printers and purchased paper compared to the same time last year.

Read more: Going green: This startup is bringing sustainability to retirement plans

However, a transition to a completely virtual approach can have its own detrimental impact on the environment, according to Riggs — even if it’s less than in-person work. An hour of streaming or video conferencing can emit between 150 and 1,000 grams of carbon dioxide, depending on the service, according to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

“We can’t assume that if something happens virtually that means it’s zero impactsays Riggs, encouraging employers and employees to stay vigilant and informed about the impact of all their actions on the environment. “Look how much you save by doing this [virtually]. There are many options, but it starts with transparency of information.

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Spiritual side: Benefit dinner with entertainment on May 21 https://slimmingpillsreview.com/spiritual-side-benefit-dinner-with-entertainment-on-may-21/ Tue, 17 May 2022 17:15:12 +0000 https://slimmingpillsreview.com/spiritual-side-benefit-dinner-with-entertainment-on-may-21/ A PRAYER FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING — Reverend Christopher Hoffmann of Our Lady of the Lakes Catholic Church in Deltona leads a prayer group near the fountain in front of the Volusia County Administration Building in DeLand on May 3. Members of FAITH (Fighting Against Injustice towards harmony). The group is praying for Volusia County Council […]]]>
A PRAYER FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING — Reverend Christopher Hoffmann of Our Lady of the Lakes Catholic Church in Deltona leads a prayer group near the fountain in front of the Volusia County Administration Building in DeLand on May 3. Members of FAITH (Fighting Against Injustice towards harmony). The group is praying for Volusia County Council to establish a countywide housing trust fund that will address the lack of affordable rental housing for working families and the elderly. The group also attended the Volusia County Council meeting that day. FAITH was founded in 2000 by a group of clergy from various congregations across the county to address community issues. TAG PHOTO/MARSHA MCLAUGHLIN

American Legion Post 259 hosts a Benefit dinner “Praise be to God” at 6 p.m. on Saturday, May 21. Entertainment will be provided by The ladies of the south. Tickets are $10 in advance or $15 at the door. Profits will benefit Operation Vet Relief. The position is at 470 Summerhaven Drive in DeBary.

Clearance Sale at Greater Faith AME Church

AME Church of the Greater Faith in Deltona hosts a clearance sale clothing, tools, household items, collectibles and more starting at 9 a.m. on Saturday, May 28. The church is at 800 Deltona Blvd.

Garage sale for the benefit of Ukraine

Faith Lutheran Church in DeLand has a Garage sale 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 4, for the benefit of Ukraine. Hot dogs, pastries, drinks and other refreshments will be served. Donations will be gladly accepted.

The church asks that the public help by donating items, which can include jewelry, plants, linens, toys, tools, small furniture, knick-knacks, and just about anything in good condition.

Donated items can be delivered to the church on Sunday morning after the 9:30 a.m. church service, or during the week on Wednesday or Friday, as long as the church office is called first at 386-734-2791 , or you can call Deborah at 386-848-3631.

As of 11:30 a.m. on June 4, all unsold items will be 50% off.

Every nickel collected will provide humanitarian aid to Ukraine through Lutheran World Reliefa branch of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Faith Lutheran Church is located at 509 E. Pennsylvania Ave. at DeLand.

We need an encounter with Jesus

“Despair is the raw material for radical change. Only those who can leave behind everything they have ever believed in can hope to escape. —William S. Burroughs

The most distressing situation a person can find themselves in is when they feel totally hopeless and feel they have absolutely no control. Unfortunately, for many people, this is a reality they have experienced or are experiencing.

Members and friends of DeLand First United Methodist Church believe that God is the true source of hope and help for anyone who finds themselves in this type of situation.

This week, in the “Encounter: Jesus Makes All Things New” sermon series, the sermon is “The Possessed Man.” He was a person running wild and naked through a cemetery with no hope until he met Jesus.

Many of us need such an encounter to help us overcome our daily struggles in life. If you want to learn more about meeting God through Jesus, join the folks at First United Methodist this Sunday as the church explores this topic.

This year the church will have Vacation Bible School 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Monday to Friday, June 20 to 24. The theme is “Monumental – Celebrating the Greatness of God”.

Contact the church office for registration information at 386-734-5113.

The environment: what must a Unitarian Universalist do?

To First Unitarian Universalist Church of West Volusia in DeLandone of the church committees is the Green team. The Green Team is responsible for informing the congregation and participating in anything that makes the environment go “green” or does not exhaust all of our resources.

At 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, May 22, the team will present a program on environmental justice. The active group acts on behalf of the world in which we live and which we hope to have for our future. Cathy Lowenstein will present information on actions we can take now and how we can be part of the Green Sanctuary movement.

Masks are discretionary at this time.

Zoom meetings for a repeat of last week’s program will also take place at 10:30 a.m., with an invitation to join between 10:15 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. This Second Chance Sunday Service meeting is the same every week: 927 1881 9188 ID: https://zoom.us/i/92718819188.

Unitarian Universalists are an open-minded, free-thinking, and open-hearted spiritual community where all are welcome as everyone learns together. A discussion may be included after each presentation.

The church can be contacted via www.uudeland.org to find out more.

Activities of the 1st Christian Church

The Rev. Patreza Newtonthe first African-American woman ordained by the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Florida, is the guest minister for the 10:45 a.m. worship service on Sunday, May 22 at DeLand’s First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Those who would like to hear it can connect to Facebook at First Christian Church – DeLand Disciples.

This dynamic minister will be assisted in worship by elders Nancy Jones and Eddie Wacherwho will administer Communion to all believers in Jesus Christ.

Christina Coulter will provide music for services on May 22 and 29, with Donna Mozley as song leader.

Julia Taylor is the host of the day, and Kathy Porr will welcome worshipers and visitors to the sanctuary, reminding everyone of the prayer meeting at 3:30 p.m. on Monday, May 23; flower arrangement at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, May 24, with Essie Miller; a meeting young people at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 25, with Janet Raney; and bingo at 7 p.m. on Friday, May 27.

Everything takes place in the fellowship hall, except for the prayer meeting, which will take place in the church library.

Continuing through the month of May, the Women Disciples under the president Sue Brague collect household linen, stationery and hygiene products for beacon center, a domestic violence shelter in Daytona Beach. Materials can be left at the church office from 8 a.m. to noon Monday through Friday or Sunday in the church narthex.

“The Resurrection of Intuition”

Unitarian Universalist Mosaic Congregation meets online at 11 a.m. every Sunday. The title of the May 22 service is “The Resurrection of Intuition.”

There are things we know that no one taught us, things we know but we don’t know how we know. There are things we trust for which we have no proof or assurance. There are things that our body knows that our conscious mind is not aware of.

On May 22, the Rev. Well collins explores the question “What if healthy spirituality included an intentional reconnection with this intuitive knowledge? »

Cult leader Judy Raymond will guide everyone through the service. Everyone is welcome.

For more information about Mosaic, see the website at mosaicuuc.org. To find out how to join the virtual service, send an email to mosaicuuc@gmail.com.

Activities at DeLand’s First Presbyterian Church

Over the past two weeks, the congregation of DeLand’s First Presbyterian Church considered the fact that the Living God has sent us to proclaim in word and deed the good news of Jesus Christ, and that when we engage with others, we should do so in love.

This week, Pastor Michael Bodger will use the biblical text in the book of Acts 16:6-15 to help us consider where Jesus would have us go.

Paul knew where he was going! The province of Asia, then Bithynia, were the logical places, but the Spirit prevented him from entering there. The Spirit pushed him further west, until the land ran out and he and those with him had to get into a boat.

Are we willing to listen to the Spirit and be sent to places and peoples different from those we think are best?

The church invites everyone to attend a Fourth Wednesday BBQ 5:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesday 25 May, in the pavilion behind the church. The barbecue will include hamburgers, hot dogs, fries and water. Bring a dish to share if you wish and enjoy the conviviality and the games.

Registration for the Vacation Bible School the “Monumental” program is available now! The school is open from 9 a.m. to noon from Monday, June 20 to Friday, June 24. Register online at www.fpcdeland.org. VBS welcomes children who have completed kindergarten through fifth grade.

A class to strengthen marriages is due to start at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, June 3. “The Art of Marriage: Getting to the Heart of God’s Purpose” will be taught by Katie and Ollie Rives. The cost is $25 per couple for the notebook. To register, email Katie at krives@fpcdstaff.org or call 352-551-5850 by Wednesday, June 1. The course will run on six Fridays.

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Three-story office building in downtown Mount Clemens is sold – Macomb Daily https://slimmingpillsreview.com/three-story-office-building-in-downtown-mount-clemens-is-sold-macomb-daily/ Sun, 15 May 2022 23:13:07 +0000 https://slimmingpillsreview.com/three-story-office-building-in-downtown-mount-clemens-is-sold-macomb-daily/ Downtown Mount Clemens continues to undergo a makeover with the sale of a building that could end up being home to a brewery. The latest change is the three-story office building at 85 N. Main Street, north of Market Street. City manager Donald Johnson said the buyer was the National Health Plans & Benefit Agency, […]]]>

Downtown Mount Clemens continues to undergo a makeover with the sale of a building that could end up being home to a brewery.

The latest change is the three-story office building at 85 N. Main Street, north of Market Street.

City manager Donald Johnson said the buyer was the National Health Plans & Benefit Agency, which struck the deal early last week. Terms were not disclosed.

“It’s important because all new businesses are important, but it’s the first of our biggest gaps to fill,” Johnson said in an email. “We have been very successful recently in occupying small spaces, but we have several large empty buildings and this will be the first of those to be occupied.”

Johnson said city officials are particularly excited about the new owner’s willingness to work with potential tenants for the first floor, which they won’t be using themselves. The National Health Plans & Benefit Agency will fill the second and third floors themselves.

The first floor will be available for rent. National health officials are already talking with a potential tenant who would like to bring a brewery to Mount Clemens, according to the city manager.

In recent months, downtown Mount Clemens has seen a flurry of new businesses housing stores and services such as Clementine’s Pastries, Black Cat Coffee, Cellar 104 Wine Boutique and CakeXperience, with more in the pipeline. , including an escape room.

Others, like Little Lorraine’s Bar, a longtime favorite watering hole known for its pizza, have plans to expand, and Gumbo’s seafood restaurant has added a new bar.

According to city officials, two highly visible buildings are still on the market. The vacant seven-story Macomb Daily building on Crocker Boulevard and the empty building that once housed a Huntington Bank at Crocker and Main Street have attracted interest, but so far no takers.

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Broward Law Enforcement Participates in Torch Run to Benefit Special Olympics – NBC 6 South Florida https://slimmingpillsreview.com/broward-law-enforcement-participates-in-torch-run-to-benefit-special-olympics-nbc-6-south-florida/ Wed, 11 May 2022 16:55:57 +0000 https://slimmingpillsreview.com/broward-law-enforcement-participates-in-torch-run-to-benefit-special-olympics-nbc-6-south-florida/ Special Olympics athletes, Broward Sheriff’s Office deputies and other South Florida law enforcement officers in the area spent Wednesday morning running along the beach for a cause . The 41st Annual Broward Law Enforcement Torch Run, which raises funds and awareness for the Florida Special Olympics, began in Fort Lauderdale Beach and stretches ten miles […]]]>

Special Olympics athletes, Broward Sheriff’s Office deputies and other South Florida law enforcement officers in the area spent Wednesday morning running along the beach for a cause .

The 41st Annual Broward Law Enforcement Torch Run, which raises funds and awareness for the Florida Special Olympics, began in Fort Lauderdale Beach and stretches ten miles to finish in Pompano Beach.

The race drew crowds of supporters, who spoke to NBC 6.

“I’m here to support my hubby from the Wilton Manors Police Department as they run,” Kendra Littleton said, while holding a sign encouraging participants.

The event began with the lighting of the flame by Fernando Nunez, Cooper City resident and Special Olympics athlete. The 2017 Special Olympics World Winter Games gold medalist carried the Olympic Torch at the start and finish of the race.

Nunez and other Special Olympics athletes were surrounded by various local law enforcement and community members to complete the ten-mile trek.

However, the race was not as difficult as it looks because it was about representing and finishing in every way possible.

“I’m pretty much walking,” said Virginia Hernandez, representing the Broward Sheriff’s Office. “Sprinting a little just to get there, but I’m not the only one.”

Some groups divided the descent into sections and had small groups do each stage.

“They have different stops where you can stop if you can’t do the full route,” said Lauderhill Police Department Chief Constance Stanley. “Again, it’s nice for a good cause and we’re happy to be here.”

The event allows law enforcement officials and personnel to bond with Special Olympians athletes and help raise awareness and support Special Olympics Florida’s mission to provide athletic training and competition while throughout the year in a variety of Olympic-style sports for people with developmental disabilities. .

“To raise awareness of Special Olympics Florida, which works with people with special needs,” said Det. Joseph Nistor of the Lauderhill Police Department. “We’re really trying to show that with this race, so other members of the public can experience Special Olympics Florida.”

The Special Olympics Florida Summer Games begin May 20 in Orlando. You can find out more by clicking on this link.

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The Tobin Center is hosting a major classic rock reunion tour for the 2022 gala https://slimmingpillsreview.com/the-tobin-center-is-hosting-a-major-classic-rock-reunion-tour-for-the-2022-gala/ Tue, 10 May 2022 00:41:57 +0000 https://slimmingpillsreview.com/the-tobin-center-is-hosting-a-major-classic-rock-reunion-tour-for-the-2022-gala/ The Doobie Brothers with Michael McDonald will headline the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts this fall. The concert is part of the band’s 50th anniversary US tour. This is the first time in over 25 years that the Doobie Brothers have toured with McDonald’s as part of the band. He left the group in […]]]>

The Doobie Brothers with Michael McDonald will headline the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts this fall.

The concert is part of the band’s 50th anniversary US tour. This is the first time in over 25 years that the Doobie Brothers have toured with McDonald’s as part of the band. He left the group in 1982 to embark on a successful solo career.

In many cities, the tour plays amphitheaters with a capacity of 20,000 or more. The Tobin Center can accommodate 1,750 people.

“We always shoot for the underplay, the artists who would typically play in a bigger space,” said Aaron Zimmerman, Tobin Center’s vice president of programming.

The October 8 performance marks the return of the centre’s annual fundraiser, which has been suspended since Gladys Knight’s performance in 2019 due to the pandemic.

Tickets range from $99 to $1,000 at tobincenter.org, at the box office, or by calling 210-223-8624.

Packages including a pre-show dinner and an after-show party can only be purchased over the phone.

Proceeds will go to the Tobin Center’s Generation Next educational initiatives, which include teacher training, field trips and sensory productions.

The Doobie Brothers were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2020. Their hits include “China Grove”, “Black Water”, “What a Fool Believes”, “Listen to the Music” and “Jesus is Just Alright with Me “. .”

Their gig follows previous headliners Paul McCartney, Lionel Richie, Dolly Parton, Steven Tyler, Paula Abdul and Knight.

The Doobie Brothers concert was announced Monday night as part of a preview of the Tobin Center’s 2022-23 subscription series.

The Nat Geo live series, which features multimedia lectures by National Geographic explorers, will feature “Capturing the Impossible,” featuring explorer Bryan Smith, on Oct. 2; “Untamed,” with filmmaker Filipe DeAndrade, Jan. 15, 2023; “Secrets of Whales,” with photographer Brian Skerry, March 19, 2023; and “Cosmic Adventures,” featuring aerospace engineer Tracy Drain, on June 11, 2023.

The Signature Series of theatrical presentations includes “The Illusionists: Holiday Magic,” Dec. 16; “9 to 5”, February 13-14, 2023; “Legally Blonde: The Musical,” March 6, 2023; and “Tootsie”, May 2-3, 2023.

Subscriptions to both series are on sale now. Single tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. on June 9.

dlmartin@express-news.net | Twitter: @DeborahMartinFR

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US finance updates: how to get stimulus checks in May 2022, how to process your tax refund faster https://slimmingpillsreview.com/us-finance-updates-how-to-get-stimulus-checks-in-may-2022-how-to-process-your-tax-refund-faster/ Sun, 08 May 2022 09:26:56 +0000 https://slimmingpillsreview.com/us-finance-updates-how-to-get-stimulus-checks-in-may-2022-how-to-process-your-tax-refund-faster/ Update the narrationSee the full narration Hello everyone and welcome to our American Finances live blog this Saturday, May 7. It might be the weekend, but we’re still bringing you the latest financial news and updates from across the United States of America. In today’s blog, we will have various guides that will tell you […]]]>

Hello everyone and welcome to our American Finances live blog this Saturday, May 7. It might be the weekend, but we’re still bringing you the latest financial news and updates from across the United States of America.

In today’s blog, we will have various guides that will tell you how the most important US government benefit plans work and how you can apply for them. At the state level, several states still offer stimulus checks or similar programs and we’ll break these down and where they run.

We will also provide IRS tax refund updates and why they take so long in some places, especially in Georgia. There is a quick and easy tool you can use to check the status of your specific tax refund claim.

People are hoping for their tax refunds to arrive soon, as the April 18 deadline for filing 2021 tax returns is now in the rearview mirror. Also, don’t worry if you forgot the deadline and haven’t paid your taxes yet, as this can still be resolved without costly penalties. We also have guides that explain how to do it.

The latest financial updates and benefits program news in the United States

As we do every day in this space, we’ll be sure to update you on the most important benefits programs, while we’ll also have breaking news from the financial world. If there’s a major transaction underway or there’s a significant development that could affect inflation or gas prices, we’ll bring it to you here.

There really is a lot to discuss here on this Saturday’s live blog on the latest financial news from the United States, as there is every day, so follow all our updates, with the most recent the closer to the top.

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New Navajo Nation Washington Office Director https://slimmingpillsreview.com/new-navajo-nation-washington-office-director/ Wed, 04 May 2022 21:18:29 +0000 https://slimmingpillsreview.com/new-navajo-nation-washington-office-director/ By John Christian Hopkins Lashawna R. Tso has been appointed executive director of the Navajo Nation’s Washington office. “We are proud to welcome one of our young Diné professionals back to the Navajo Nation to serve our people. With her extensive background and experience, we are confident that she will champion the interests of our […]]]>

By John Christian Hopkins

Lashawna R. Tso has been appointed executive director of the Navajo Nation’s Washington office.

“We are proud to welcome one of our young Diné professionals back to the Navajo Nation to serve our people. With her extensive background and experience, we are confident that she will champion the interests of our people and strengthen relationships. of our nation at the federal level,” said Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez.

Tso grew up in the Navajo Nation, went to college and is now “back home to help our people again,” Nez added.

Tso is a member of the Navajo Nation and originally from Smoke Signal, Arizona. She is Tódik’ǫzhi (salt water) and born for Mą’ii deeshgiizhinii (Coyote Pass). His maternal grandfather is Áshįįhi (Salt People) and his paternal grandfather is Chíshí (Chiricahua Apache).

Prior to his appointment, Tso served as Assistant Secretary of Indian Education for New Mexico and Chief of Staff in the Office of the Speaker of the Legislative Branch of the Navajo Nation. She also served as Legislative Staff Assistant for the Navajo Nation for four years prior.

Tso replaces former executive director Santee Lewis, who recently started a new role working with tribal nations with the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer thanked Lewis for his service to the Navajo Nation and wished him well in his new position.

“We greatly appreciate Ms. Lewis’ tremendous service to the Navajo Nation. She has worked with many partners on many issues and she has been instrumental in securing federal COVID-19 relief funding for the Navajo people by working with various departments and programs to collect and submit data to the US Treasury,” Lizer said. “We look forward to working with and supporting Ms. Tso.”

Tso holds a Bachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Science from Arizona State University and a Masters in Public Administration from Grand Canyon University with a major in government and politics.

“I am deeply honored to serve our people in Washington, D.C. This could not have come at a better time – under the Biden-Harris administration, we have the opportunity to engage with our federal partners and members of Congress significantly,” Tso explained.

The Washington office will continue to work hard to ensure that the investments made by Congress will benefit our people and our communities across Navajo, she said.

“I’m ready to get to work,” Tso added.

She will officially take office as the new chief executive on May 16.

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New Boynton Beach City Commission still faces major challenges https://slimmingpillsreview.com/new-boynton-beach-city-commission-still-faces-major-challenges/ Sun, 01 May 2022 11:06:31 +0000 https://slimmingpillsreview.com/new-boynton-beach-city-commission-still-faces-major-challenges/ Firing a long-time city manager is normally a difficult decision. The fact that it was a largely new and untested group of elected officials who made this decision at Boynton Beach was even more extraordinary. Last month, the City Commission voted 4-1 to terminate Lori LaVerriere, a City Hall figure who failed to win the […]]]>

Firing a long-time city manager is normally a difficult decision. The fact that it was a largely new and untested group of elected officials who made this decision at Boynton Beach was even more extraordinary.

Last month, the City Commission voted 4-1 to terminate Lori LaVerriere, a City Hall figure who failed to win the support of three of the new commissioners.

“We have to take this step,” Mayor Ty Penserga said after the vote. “It’s difficult. It’s uncomfortable. But that’s what we’re elected to do…It’s necessary to keep us going.”

FOR SUBSCRIBERS:Major reshuffle in Boynton: Lori LaVerriere fired as city manager; District 4 Seat Filled

We’ll see. Penserga, Vice Mayor Angela Cruz and Commissioners Thomas Turkin and Aimee Kelley ousted LaVerriere. Cruz and Turkin won the elections in March. Kelley was named to the commission just before voting to fire the director.

Lori LaVerriere, former City Manager of Boynton Beach

The sudden vote leaves the commission without a permanent executive to face challenges that would give seasoned politicians pause. Forget the typical problems that most urban communities face – crime, infrastructure demands, poverty and neighborhood redevelopment. The challenges facing the county’s third-largest municipality are daunting, especially for a new municipal commission.

It’s about resolving racial animosity in a divided community over an unauthorized police chase by a white officer that ended in the fatal crash of a black teenager on a dirt bike. The officer, Mark Sohn, remains on administrative leave, pending the results of an internal investigation.

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State contract and payment actions in March https://slimmingpillsreview.com/state-contract-and-payment-actions-in-march/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 20:57:14 +0000 https://slimmingpillsreview.com/state-contract-and-payment-actions-in-march/ In March, the Office of the State Comptroller approved 1,950 contracts for state agencies and public authorities worth $3.6 billion and approved nearly 3.7 million payment payments. worth nearly $35.1 billion. The bureau rejected 147 contracts and related transactions worth $1.4 billion and more than 9,100 payments worth more than $30.9 million, mostly for errors, […]]]>

In March, the Office of the State Comptroller approved 1,950 contracts for state agencies and public authorities worth $3.6 billion and approved nearly 3.7 million payment payments. worth nearly $35.1 billion. The bureau rejected 147 contracts and related transactions worth $1.4 billion and more than 9,100 payments worth more than $30.9 million, mostly for errors, insufficient support for abusive fees and payments. More information about these contracts and payments is available at Open Book New York.

Main contracts approved

Office of General Services – Design and Construction

  • $14 million with Quackenbush Co., Inc. for the installation of an above-floor heating system and underground hot water pipes at Lakeview Correctional Institution in Chautauqua County.
  • $11.2 million with TAM Enterprises Inc. for sewage treatment plant upgrades at Bedford Hills Correctional Facility in Westchester County.

health department

  • $48.8 million with Magellan Medicaid Administration Inc. to administer drug benefits for the American Indian Health and Elderly Pharmaceutical Insurance Coverage (EPIC) programs.
  • $19.2 million with Island Peer Review Organization Inc. for AIDS intervention clinical studies, program evaluation and quality of care review.

Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation

  • $5 million with Henningson Durham & Richardson Architecture and Engineering PC for construction management services for the Fjord Trail Breakneck Bridge at Hudson Highlands Park in Dutchess County.
  • $1 million with Valleyview Enterprise LLC for the new Destination Playground at Letchworth State Park in Livingston and Wyoming counties.

State University Building Fund

  • $17.7 million with Manning Squires Hennig Co., Inc. to renovate Buffalo State College’s classroom building.
  • $3 million with Cunningham Excavation Inc. to construct a new artificial turf field at SUNY Delhi.

State University of New York

  • $6.3 million with AWL Industries Inc. for the construction of the new Seamanship Center at SUNY Maritime.
  • $5.8 million with G&M Earth Moving Inc. for parking improvements at Farmingdale State College.

New York State Highway Authority

  • $17.8 million with Crisdel Group Inc. for a rolling mill and inlay in Rockland County.
  • $12.4 million with Transcore LP for EZ Pass NY transponder distribution services.

transport department

  • $776.4 million with Tully Construction Co., Inc. to improve capacity and access to the Van Wyck Freeway in Queens County.
  • $19.8 million with Suit-Kote Corp. for milling and resurfacing, guide rail and sign replacement on I-81 in Broome County.
  • $19.5 million with Rifenburg Construction Inc. for milling and paving on I-890 in Schenectady County.
  • $14.5 million with Peckham Road Corp. for the resurfacing of I-87 in Essex County.

Main payments approved

Refunds and tax credits

  • $1.9 billion for 1,884,873 personal income tax refunds.
  • $118.9 million for 11,662 corporate and other tax refunds.
  • $2 million for 2,175 property tax credits.

Office of Child and Family Services

  • $44.6 million through the Child Care Stabilization Grant to child care providers to help cover unforeseen business costs associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and to help stabilize operations so that providers can continue to provide care.

City University of New York

  • $7.8 million to support the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including desktop computers, IT equipment, and medical and laboratory technicians.

Civil Service Department

  • $277.9 million to CVS Caremark to provide drug benefit services for the Empire, Excelsior and Student Employee Health plans.
  • $27.8 million to Beacon Health Options Inc. for Empire Plan Mental Health and Addictions Program benefit services.

Department of Corrections and Community Supervision

  • $6.7 million to support the response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

National Education Department

  • $7.2 billion in general assistance to 626 school districts.
  • $1.7 billion in excess cost assistance for school-aged students in special education in 666 school districts.

Empire State Development Corporation

  • $4.3 million to NextCorps Inc. for the Luminate NY program to attract and grow optics, photonics and imaging businesses in the Finger Lakes region.
  • $3.8 million to Excell Technology Ventures Inc. to provide funding primarily to high-tech start-ups in the Finger Lakes region through the Finger Lakes Venture Fund.
  • $3.8 million to the SUNY Research Foundation for a portion of the equipment, software, and operating expenses needed to establish the NYS Genomic Medicine and Buffalo Institute for Genomics & Data Analytics (BIG) Data Center in Buffalo .
  • $1 million to Saab North America, Inc. for a portion of machinery and equipment costs related to the relocation of Saab Defense and Security USA’s North American headquarters to Onondaga County.

Executive room

  • $884,000 to Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP for legal services.

General Service Office

  • $15.5 million for hourly computer services, including $4.1 million to Knowledge Builders Inc., $1.3 million to Computer Technology Services Inc., $1 million to MVP Consulting Plus Inc. and 9 .1 million to 29 other suppliers.
  • $2.2 million for purchases to support the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including health management services.

health department

  • $536.1 million to support the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including medical supplies and equipment.
  • $20.8 million to New York eHealth Collaborative Inc. for the New York State Health Information Network.
  • $14.7 million to Maximus Inc. for assistance with the Health Benefit Exchange, including insurance enrollment and call center operations.

Computer Services Office

  • $1.1 million for purchases to support the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including cloud computing services.

Joint Public Ethics Commission

  • $101,900 to Hogan Lovells US LLP for legal services.

Ministry of Labour

  • $250.1 million for payments under Unemployment Insurance, Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation, Mixed-Income Individuals Compensation and assistance in the event of loss of salary.
  • $1 million for the Tourism Worker Recovery program.

New York State Legislature – Assembly

  • $251,500 to Jenner & Block LLP for legal services.

New York State Legislature – Senate

  • $148,500 to Cuti Hecker Wang LLP for legal services.

Mental Health Office

  • $1.6 million to support the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including medical supplies and equipment and temporary staff services.

Military and Naval Affairs Division

  • $1.4 million for purchases to support the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including food and beverages and vehicle rentals.

State University of New York

  • $3.8 million to support the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including administrative and clerical services, as well as medical and laboratory supplies and equipment.

Temporary Assistance and Disability Office

  • $149.5 million for the Emergency Rental Assistance Program.
  • $33 million for the Landlord Rental Assistance Program.

Unified court system

  • $2.1 million for purchases to support the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including local grants and government assistance.

Other chargebacks and other cost recoveries

The OSC rejected refunds and tax credits valued at nearly $17.3 million. Comptroller’s auditors also recovered nearly $525,000 from debtor suppliers to the state.

Cumulatively through March for calendar year 2022, the Comptroller’s Office approved 4,738 contracts worth $8.3 billion and approved nearly 8.5 million payments worth nearly $56 billion, including nearly 2.3 million unemployment insurance payments worth more than $784.4 million. The bureau rejected 337 contracts and related transactions worth $1.7 billion and more than 19,500 payments worth more than $61.6 million.


Track state and local government spending on Open Book New York. As part of State Comptroller DiNapoli’s open data initiative, search millions of state and local government financial records, track state contracts, and find frequently requested data.

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Youngkin and Miyares’ appeal against the mask decision is a harsh publicity stunt https://slimmingpillsreview.com/youngkin-and-miyares-appeal-against-the-mask-decision-is-a-harsh-publicity-stunt/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 04:07:50 +0000 https://slimmingpillsreview.com/youngkin-and-miyares-appeal-against-the-mask-decision-is-a-harsh-publicity-stunt/ Who will benefit from calling a federal court decision — asked by Gov. Glenn Youngkin, Attorney General Jason Miyares and other administration officials — it would call into question whether 12 students with serious medical conditions can legally ask classmates and teachers to continue to wear masks? Certainly not the overwhelming majority of Virginia public […]]]>

Who will benefit from calling a federal court decision — asked by Gov. Glenn Youngkin, Attorney General Jason Miyares and other administration officials — it would call into question whether 12 students with serious medical conditions can legally ask classmates and teachers to continue to wear masks?

Certainly not the overwhelming majority of Virginia public school students. The first day at Youngkin’s office Executive Decree give parents the ability to hide their children, and a later invoice adopted by the General Assembly as of March 1 doing the same, means that the subject is basically moot.

These movements have occurred even as the pandemic continues. (America’s death toll from COVID-19 is greater than 991,000although the recent trend is positive. Over 20,200 Virginians have been dead since early 2020.)

The 12 children with various serious illnesses also do not benefit from the posture of the administration. They are at greater risk of catching COVID-19 – and possibly dying. These young people have cancer, cystic fibrosis, asthma and more. The question is far from intellectual for them and their parents.

They gain nothing from the Youngkin administration’s publicity stunt.

No, it’s about scoring political points and making hay for the next election. Republicans Youngkin, Miyares and others in the administration are seeking total dominance over mask-optional initiatives. Even though they basically have it.

Their message to the small handful of families trying to get their children back to school safely? Pfft.

U.S. District Judge Norman Moon decided at the end of March that the 12 specific pupils could ask their schools to impose masking. The families, with the help of the ACLU of Virginia and other groups, declared optional mask policy effectively prevented their children from going to school. It’s a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, they claim.

But Moon was also careful to note that the executive order and state law remain in effect. As The Associated Press reported, families of other disabled children should make their own requests for relief.

“This is not a class action,” Moon wrote, “and the 12 plaintiffs in this case have no legal right to ask the Court to deviate from this state law in Virginia schools. (much less the school districts) that their children do not attend, or even the areas of their schools where the plaintiffs’ children do not attend.”

This means that the Youngkin administration and Miyares got almost everything they wanted. School divisions also don’t have to accede to family requests for mandatory mask-wearing.

I wondered why Miyares appealed. His spokeswoman, Victoria LaCivita, declined to comment on “active litigation.” The Attorney General’s website also had no news on the matter.

When I asked Youngkin’s reasoning for the appeal, his spokesperson referred me to Miyares’ office.

Kaitlin Banner is deputy legal director of the Washington Lawyers Committee, one of the groups that has helped the 12 families of children with critical illnesses. She told me that several students had returned to school since Judge Moon’s ruling. She said he did review the ADA and determined “that students have the right to attend schools safely.”

One parent upset by the administration’s decision to appeal is Chris Seaman, who lives in Crozet and is the father of an 8-year-old boy who is battling leukemia.

“It really is a slap in the face, to be honest,” Seaman told me over the phone this week. “We just want to be able to get our kids to school in a safe environment.”

Seaman’s son and a younger brother attended Brownsville Elementary School in Albemarle County. The third-year student learned from a distance because he has undergone chemotherapy, T-cell therapy and a bone marrow transplant over the years.

But his family wants him back. They have a meeting scheduled this week with the school administrators.

“I hope they will be ready to give us accommodation” that his son’s classmates and instructors wear masks.

Here’s what Seaman and his wife have been up to since their eldest son was diagnosed with cancer more than three years ago: There have been weekly, then monthly, trips to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, where the boy was participating in a clinical trial.

The trip takes five hours one way. They have made the trip dozens of times.

Although their child is now in remission, Seaman said, he is still on multiple medications.

“If he gets COVID and he’s immunocompromised, he would be at higher risk of getting serious illness,” the father said.

Parents from the local community supported the family. People told him they would continue to mask up, Seaman said, “and we appreciate that.”

His take on state officials appealing Judge Moon’s ruling? “It looks like they are deliberately targeting our children,” Seaman said.

In effect. And why?

Miyares, Youngkin & Co. should declare victory and drop the appeal. They won their assault on mandatory mask-wearing.

What they don’t want is for some of the dozen children to die from COVID-19, possibly transmitted by a classmate or educator. They would then have to explain why they were so adamant about their legal — and political — agenda on masks in schools.

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